People new to wireless computing often confuse WiFi technology with cellular phone technology. The wireless capability built-into laptops is known as WiFi, and is defined by the IEEE standard for networking,

Wireless Networking Services

Wireless Networking Services

(802.11b/g/n and sometimes y), where “b” is an older, slower standard, and “g” is the most widely used. Faster and more powerful versions, “n” and “y” have been defined for some time but were only implemented in laptop hardware very recently. WiFi technology relies on low power transceivers built-into both the laptop and the modem/router that brings high speed Internet into your home or workplace. WiFi may also be transmitted through stand-alone routers or repeaters (access points) that are hard wired to a high speed network. The range of the current WiFi networks is very low, on the order 100ft (30m) within a structure, depending on the construction, and not more than a few hundred feet (100m) in the open air.

Not surprisingly, the first problem most new laptop owners encounter with trying to connect to a wireless network is that their WiFi has inadvertently been switched off. The next most common problem is that the signal strength is too weak to hold a connection. This can be extremely confusing if the network is working fine for a person sitting at the next table, but that laptop might have a more sensitive receiver, be set in just the right location, or even be accessing a different network. When you’re troubleshooting a wireless connection, it makes sense to get as close to the router as you can, certainly in the same room if it’s in your own home, so you can eliminate signal strength as a possible issue.

If you are facing any wireless connectivity issue feel free to contact your trusted nationwide IT services provider for any technical assistance